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Can you help us help other pets and animals? (Yes you can!)

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Millions of pets and animals could benefit from WeStopFear but their owners don’t know about this program. Many would want to do this for their pets just like you.

Click hear to read more – and help other pets and animals, and benefit yourself too

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Main Instructions for WeStopFear

The key to success is knowledge

Please familiarise yourself with these Main instructions, as well as the Important Details and Signs of Fear and Phobia. A quick overview is also available on the Quick Focus page.

This method is basically simple

The therapy method is basically very simple:

Let your dog hear sounds that may cause fear or is causing fear already, starting very low in the beginning and gradually increasing in volume over the days and weeks. In the end, the sounds are played at full natural volume.

When successful, your dog has gotten used to the sounds at full volume in the location, has always experienced no danger, and will no longer see them as possibly coming from something dangerous.

This solution is designed to be an innovative game changer

The five step, pre-set design of WeStopFear, with the innovations of Simple Secure Steps, Volume Anchor and Natural Intervals, should make this much easier, simpler and more secure than previous therapy methods. Yet, to implement this therapy successfully, it is necessary to honour certain principles and minding a few details.

First an overview, with links to comprehensive description

Below you see an overview of the process steps.

Each short text outlines the basics. If you want, you can click “Read more…” at each item.

A short overview of WeStopFear

Read the list for a quick overview.
Each line includes a clickable link.
Click a link to read more about each item.

1.A. > Determine the places where you will play the sounds.  It is important to play in all places where your dog spends some time. Create a list and write down – The link to a pre-made form to write down on is in the text below. (Read more…)

1.B. > Find out what audio devices you have for each place, to play the sounds on. Write down next to the places on the list. (Read more…)

1.C .> If you don’t have an audio device for a location, consider how to get one (borrow, rent, be given, buy). (Read more…)

1.D .> For the audio devices you have, find out what kind of audio media these devices use. Write down. (Read more…)

1.E. > Find the correct sound volume on your audio playing device(s), in each place. You will do that by playing the first track, the Volume Anchor piano tune, so that the piano music is at a comfortable listening volume level. (Read more…)
In each place, you will use that volume setting on that audio device, in all the steps throughout the therapy. You do not change the setting on the device itself with a new step. (Read more…)

1.F. > If there are markings or a scale showing the volume in some numerical way, next to the volume button, write down the volume setting(s) on each device in each place, on the list. (Read more…)

1.G. > If there are no markings or scale by the volume button, use the Volume Anchor piano tune each time. (Read more…)

1.H. > Now you have what you need: A list you will easily refer to each time, (Don’t rely on memory.) (Read more…)

1.I. > How long should the duration of each sound playing session be? 70 minutes is average, although you can vary. Just make sure all sounds are played in a location, in each step.

1.J. > You will start with Step 1. Finish that, then go to Step 2, through Steps 3, 4 and 5, according to instructions below. (Read more…)

Secretly keep a close eye on your dog

2. > To monitor the state of your dog, refer to the List of Signs of Fear and Phobia in Dogs. (Read more…)
2. > Slight tension? (Read more…)
2. > Keep unchanged. Continue, until relaxed. When relaxed, progress to the next step. (Read more…)

3. > Considerable tension? (Read more…)
3. > Lower the sound level, or lower back to previous step if necessary. Continue from there, until relaxed. When relaxed, change to the next step. (Read more…)

4. > Indifferent and relaxed in a place? You have reached the goal in that place. – Indifferent and relaxed in all the locations where you play the sounds? The step is finished successfully! (Read more…)
4. > Click the confirmation button in the green section “Relaxed in all locations?” at the bottom of the step page. Change to the next step up. (Read more…)
4. > If you are at Step 5 and see indifference and relaxation in all places: congratulations! The therapy is a success! (Read more…)

5. > If during some of the steps: Extreme tension and fear, that won‘t go away? (Read more…)
5. > Stop the therapy and contact your vet. (Read more…)

See Signs of Fear and Phobia in Dogs Here.

Also consider this:

6. > Be balanced. Show no response. Don’t feel sorry or talk in a sorry voice. You may increase the fear by doing that. (Read more…)
6. > Don‘t let your dog sense that you manage the sounds. The sounds should come out of thin air, as if by coincidence. (Read more…)
6. >However, if your dog is perfectly happy and relaxed, you may reward. (Read more…)

7. > Play the sounds in random order for realism, and at different times of the day. (Read more…)

8. > Play the sounds in various places. This is to avoid locational tolerance. (Read more…)
8. > Obtain a portable sound equipment if you don’t have one. You can try getting it cheap, or borrow one. (Read more…)

9. > Keep the location free from other stimuli that may distract when doing the therapy. (Read more…)

10. > Do what you like while the noises are playing. Don’t become bored yourself. Let all family members tolerate the process. Same goes for neighbours. It may be a good idea that you (or other household members) relieve yourself during this by listening yourself to favorite music or an audio book, or watch video or TV, with headphones. (Read more…)

11. > Consult your vet before starting. (Read more…)

After finishing the five steps: Maintenance

12. > Maintain short recap of the therapy once in a while. Also a few days before known stress-inducing events. (Read more…)
12. > Total resistance of new sounds cannot be promised. However, there should be greater tolerance to new sounds. (Read more…)

Other instructional pages:

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Simple Secure Steps Main Instructions

Therapy Instruction # 1.A. of 12

1.A. > Determine the places where you will play the sounds. It is important to play in all places where your dog spends some time. Create a list and write down.

This could be:

  • Inside the main rooms in your home, where you keep your main audio system.
  • Inside another room.
  • In a garage or shed
  • Outside in various places
  • In the car

It is important to try to play the sounds in all the places where your dog may hear those sounds. Otherwise, your dog may become used to sounds in one place, but be afraid of them in a place where he has never heard them; (locational tolerance).

Write down the information

Create a list and write down the places, as well as the other information here after (device, media, volume setting).

A special form has been created in several versions, to make this easier for you. Right-click and download:

Form on RTF format (for PC and Mac).

Form on adobe PDF format

Form on MS-Excel (PC).

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Therapy Instruction # 1 B-C of 12

1.B. > Find out what audio devices you have for each place, to play the sounds on. Write down next to the places on the list. 1.C .> If you don’t have an audio device for a location, consider how to get one (borrow, rent, be given, buy).

The basic requirements for the audio devices are simple: In the last Step number 5, the device and the loudspeakers should be able to deliver a sound with a sound volume and sound quality that is as reasonably close to the sounds of the actual phenomena as you can possibly get it, when they are heard in the natural setting (be it fireworks, traffic, household appliances, thunder, or anything else).

These devices could be:

  • A portable stereo of some kind, for instance a laptop computer, a portable stereo, a tablet or a smart phone, and loudspeaker set connected by cable or wi-fi or bluetooth.
  • A stationary stereo set/surround sound equipment in a room, with built-in or loose loudspeakers (two loudspeakers for a stereo, 5+1 loudspeakers for instance for a surround sound home cinema system), or perhaps a desktop comuter with loose loudspeakers.
  • A car stereo in the car.

Write down what device to use in each place on a list, (you may be using a portable stereo device in more than one place).

If you don’t have an audio device for a location, consider how to get one (someone may have an old portable stereo that you can borrow, you may be able to rent a device, someone might be happy to give you an old, perfectly working portable device when that person hears the purpose, or you may buy a new device, for instance because you think you want a new one to, otherwise, serve your musical needs).

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Therapy Instruction # 1.D. of 12

1.D .> For the audio devices you have, find out what kind of audio media these devices use. Write it down next to each audio device on the list.

These media could be:

  • Downloaded audio MP3 files sets (five sets for the five steps, zipped so you have to un-zip them, and place them in conveniently named folders, one folder for each MP3 set – for more on that, see the instructions page for MP3 audio files.)
  • Streaming audio, through your web connection (please note to use a free or low cost wi-fi connection for portable devices, otherwise your 3G or 4G cell phone system charges may become exuberantly high, although that is dependent on your service contract).
  • 5 audio CD discs you burn yourself using the MP3 files, (for instructions on how to burn CDs, see here). You must mark each disc very clearly according to the step which the MP3 files are for, which you burned on that disc.
  • Maybe a data CD (on which you burn the MP3 files directly, and played in a computer or CD player that can play MP3 directly. That may be your choice if you are so technologically inclined).

Write down the audio media, just for your convenience, next to the device on the device list.

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Therapy Instruction # 1 E-G of 12

1.E. > Find the correct sound volume on your audio playing device(s).
In each place, you will use that volume setting on that audio device, in every step throughout the therapy.
1.F. > Write down the volume setting(s).
1.G. > If there are no markings or scale by the volume button, use the Volume Anchor piano tune each time.

 

The Simple Secure Steps system is divided into five steps.

At the beginning of each step is a piano tune. When you have determined the sound volume for the piano tune, you have basically found the volume setting for all steps. The piano tune is the “volume anchor” , is always set at the same volume on the audio device in all steps in that particular location. The therapy sounds of each step are then set correctly, from very low in the first step to full volume in the fifth step. This makes managing the volume much simpler, and is one of the fundamental benefits of Simple Secure Steps of WeStopFear.

Please note that the piano tune is not a part of the noise phobia therapy per se. It is just to allow you to set the volume setting on the device correctly. If there are volume markings by the volume button on the device, or some way of writing down and seeing later on what is the correct volume setting on the device in that particular location, then it is best to write down that volume setting. Thus, it is unnecessary to play the piano tune at the beginning of each session. You simply set the volume, and go to part 2 of that step which is to play the therapy sound, and skip part 1 which is playing the piano tune, the Volume Anchor™. If you can set the volume without playing the piano tune, then you do that in Step 1 and subsequent Steps #2, 3, 4 and 5.

1.E.1. Set the piano music volume at the beginning to a comfortable listening level so you hear the piano tune well and clearly (not dinner music low, not loud as at a party, just in between). This means you are using the Volume Anchor piano music to “anchor” the volume at the right volume.

1.E.2. Find this volume setting for the Volume Anchor piano tune on all the audio devices you will be using, in the locations you are playing, so that the piano music is at the comfortable listening level. Locations that are different in size and acoustic characteristics may call for different settings on the same audio device. Write down the volume settings on each playback device for each place.

Note: The piano music should sound at a similar audio volume in all places, i.e. “a comfortable listening level” of the piano music. Since audio devices are different, with different amplifier power and different loudspeakers, then you need to find the volume setting on each device (often a scale from 1 to 10). If you are using a portable audio device, then the volume setting may be different in a small room, and outside, because the acoustic conditions are different in these two places. You probably need to set the volume higher outside. So you need to find this reasonable volume setting in each place, and write it down.

1.E.3. In a given place, you will be using this volume setting on that audio device unchanged, throughout the therapy, in all the five steps. However, you may alter it just slightly if you find it necessary.

1.F. Write down the volume settings, for each audio device in each place. Don’t rely on memory.

1.G. If there is no volume meter, markings or scale next to the volume button on an audio device (be it a physical button or slider on a device, or “button” on the screen of a computer, or “button” on the touch-screen of a smart phone or tablet), and thus nothing to write down, then the Volume Anchor piano tune will help you find the right volume every time, (by finding the comfortable listening volume level of the piano music in that place, each and every time).

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Therapy Instruction # 1 of 12

1.H. > Now you have what you need: A list you will easily refer to each time, (Don’t rely on memory.)

Now you have a list of: The places where you will play the sounds, what audio device you use in each place, (and the audio media), and the audio volume setting on each device in each place. It will be easy for you to refer to that list, each time you do the therapy. Don’t rely on memory. Store that list in a good place. Even, take a copy of it, or take a photo of it on your smart phone, so you have a copy in case the original list gets lost. Table of contents Top of page

Therapy Instruction # 1.I-J. of 12

1.I. > How long should the duration of each sound playing session be? 70 minutes is average, although you can vary. Just make sure all sounds are played in a location, in each step, until your dog is relaxed and indifferent.

1.J. > You will start with Step 1. Finish that in all locations, then go to Step 2 and finish in all the same locations, an so on through Steps 3, 4 and 5, according to instructions.

1.I. How long should the duration of each sound playing session be? 70 minutes is average, although you can vary. Just make sure all sounds are played in a location, in each step, until your dog is relaxed and indifferent.

Over the course of playing the sounds, in each of the five steps, it is necessary to play all the sounds, in all the places, so you can observe if your dog is afraid of some of the sounds in a particular place, at the volume level of the step you are at each time.

Since you are playing the sounds on a random/RND/shuffle setting, it may happen that a particular sound is played more than once in a session, and another sound isn’t played in that session. Over time, in several sessions, this should even out, so you have played all sounds in a place, and observed your dog’s reactions.

If you choose to play in shorter sessions, that is perfectly okay. However, then not all the sounds will be played. This means you need to play more often, meaning it will take more time to finish a certain step, in a certain place.

You can choose to play for a shorter period than 30 minutes. Then of course, not all the sounds in the sound set will be played in that session. To cover all the sounds in the set, you would need 2-3 sessions in that place.

Generally, it is a good idea to play the sounds for an hour at least each time, and to do it several times in a place, so you can observe your dog’s reaction to all sounds, in all places, at all volume levels.

If you see that your dog is especially anxious over a certain sound, it makes sense to select and play that sound manually, instead of relying on the random function to select it.

This you will simply decide and manage, based on how sensitive your dog is to the sounds.

1.J. You will start with Step 1. Play the therapy sounds for Step 1 several times in each place (one place per day), on the audio device for that place, using the correct volume setting for that place. When your dog is relaxed over the sounds in all places, you will change to Step 2, playing the therapy sounds for Step 2 in the same way. When your dog is relaxed in all places, you will change to Step 3 in the same way, and then Step 4 and finally Step 5, which is the last and “graduation” step. When your dog is relaxed in all places at that sound volume, the therapy is a success! Your dog has become accustomed to all sounds in all places, and is considered “graduated”! Your dog should now be less likely to suffer from noise phobia problems in the future.

In short, this is the process:

Make the audio media for Step 1 ready, and play in the place you have chosen. Do this in all the places where you have determined that the sounds should be played in. You could typically play in one place on a particular day, in another place the next day, in yet another place on the next day after that when you play the sounds, and so on. When your dog is used to the sounds at the volume level of Step 1 in all the places, it is time to go to Step 2.

Step 2: Same process basically. Make the audio media for Step 2 ready, for the place you are playing in. Do this in all the places, until your dog has gotten used to the sounds at the volume level of Step 2, in all the places you have chosen to play the sounds. When that is the case, it is time to move to Step 3.

Steps 3, 4 and 5 are implemented in the same way.

The benefits of the Simple Secure Steps and Volume Anchor: The Volume Anchor piano tune is always set at the same volume in the beginning of all the steps on the audio device chosen for that particular place. The subsequent therapy sounds in each sound file set are pre-set at different audio volumes, correctly for each step. this pre-setting is what makes the process much simpler to implement than in the most common therapy design.

In the most common therapy method, there is only one MP3 files set or one CD, where all the sounds are at full volume. There, you have to manually set the volume correctly every time you play, correctly, from very low in the first plays to full volume in the last plays, potentially weeks later. That leads to the danger of accidentally playing the sounds too high too early, a danger that is eliminated with the pre-set volumes of this therapy solution. In step 1 the audio volume pre-set for the therapy sounds is so low that you can hardly hear it. It should be that way! In later steps, the audio volume becomes gradually higher, also pre-set at the correct volume for each of these steps.

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Secretly keep a close eye on your dog

Therapy Instruction # 2 of 12

> To monitor the state of your dog, refer to the List of Signs of Fear and Phobia in Dogs.
> Slight tension?
> Keep unchanged. Continue, until relaxed. When relaxed, progress to the next step.

While the process is on-going, keep an eye on your dog to monitor if he is relaxed or anxious. Refer to the comprehensive list of signs of fear and phobia in dogs, so you can accurately understand the psychological state your dog is in.

During all steps:

If you see just a little bit of tension and discomfort, you are in the right spot. Continue like this. You can edge the sound just slightly upwards.

Make sure that you remain balanced and act as if nothing in particular is happening, and you don’t let your dog see that you are observing its state.

When your dog gets used to the sound, and it is carefree and relaxed, next time, go to the next step above this.

This is the desired pattern over the weeks. As you progress from step 1 to step 2, and then onwards to steps 3, 4 and 5, you will be  continuously increasing the sound volume at the pace your dog can easily handle, and yet keeping it just near the brink of stress all the time.

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Therapy Instruction # 3 of 12

> Considerable tension?
> Lower the sound level, or lower it back to a previous step if necessary. Continue from there, until your dog is relaxed. When he is relaxed, change to the next step up.

During all steps:

If your dog expresses considerable anxiety and worry when the sounds are played, you can lower the sound level a bit. See guidelines for lowering the volume at the bottom of the page.

If the tension is still too great, go again to the step below this one, play it for some time until your dog is relaxed, then go one step up again.

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Therapy Instruction # 4 of 12

> Indifferent and relaxed in a place? You have reached the goal in that place. – Indifferent and relaxed in all the locations where you play the sounds? The step is finished successfully!
> Click the confirmation button in the green section “Relaxed in all locations?” at the bottom of the step page. Change to the next step up.
> If you are at Step 5 and see indifference and relaxation in all places: congratulations! The therapy is a success!

During Steps 1 to 4:

Over the course of weeks or even months, tolerance will be built up to the sounds, as you gradually increase the sound volume, by changing from one step to the next, in the correct order.

Do you only see complete relaxation and not the least care about the sounds, in the step you currently are at? Next time you do a session (typically the day after) go to the next step.

At the end of Step 5:

When the sound volume coming from the sound equipment is realistically similar to the real “natural” sounds, and if you see only complete relaxation, no fear and no worry right in the middle of all these noises, in all the places where you have been playing the sounds, then the therapy is a success!

Congratulations! Your dog has reached the goal the noise phobia therapy.

Please see also therapy instruction # 12 for future recommendations.

After this goal is met, ongoing maintenance of the success is necessary, for otherwise the acquired tolerance will slowly wear off.

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Therapy Instruction # 5 of 12

> If during some of the steps: is there extreme tension and fear, that won’t go away?
> Stop the therapy and contact your vet.

During all steps (more so during earlier ones):

If your dog is extremely anxious, in a state of shock, commotion, or perceivably in mental pain, even if you lower down the sound volume, then you must stop.

Please contact your veterinarian. There may be other more serious problems affecting the situation (see the Important Details sections #10, 29 and 32).

Also consider this

How long will this process take?

It is impossible to answer that. Some dogs have very little propensity for noise phobia, while others may need 2-3 months. There is no better or worse in this, and you should not compete for the shortest time. Just let the sensitivity of your dog guide the speed.

What type of audio equipment should you use?

Please see the dedicated page about audio devices and acoustics, and also section #5 on the Important Details page.

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Therapy Instruction # 6 of 12

> Be balanced. Show no response. Don’t feel sorry or talk in a sorry voice. You may increase the dog’s fear by doing that.
> Don’t let your dog sense that you manage the sounds. The sounds should come out of thin air, as if by coincidence.
>However, if he is perfectly happy and relaxed, you may give some reward.

How you react and behave is very important. Don’t show any reaction to the sounds or to your dog’s reactions to the sounds. Be calm and balanced as if nothing of any importance is going on. Just continue what you are doing while the sounds are playing. Remember, you know that these are just sounds from a sound system, which reproduces sound that are heard normally in our modern world and are not dangerous in themselves.

Ignore any signs of anxiety, if your dog is just slightly stressed. (An exception to this rule is a situation as described in instruction # 5 of extreme stress and tension).

This reaction of showing no reaction is actually being kind. Your dog will learn by observing you. It senses that there is no reason to be frightened, because YOU are not worried.

Don’t let your dog realize that you are managing these sounds. They should simply appear without reason, like any other environmental sounds that your hear. It is your job to make sure it is so.

Warning: Some dog owners are rewarding unnecessary fear in their dog by talking in a soothing voice, consoling and feeling sorry for their dog, and thus reinforcing the idea that there is actually something scary going on when the sounds are being played. The dog then thinks that these sounds must be really dangerous since its owner reacts like this! By that, the owners are unknowingly TRAINING their dog to become MORE afraid of noises.

If your dog is perfectly happy and relaxed regardless of the sounds, then you can safely reward it by giving some comfort. By that, you are rewarding its well-grounded balance and carefree stance.

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Therapy Instruction # 7 of 12

> Play the sounds in random order for realism, and at different times of the day.

Play the sounds in random order, using the random setting (RND or Shuffle). This is because these sounds don’t occur in the same order in the real world. Also have therapy sessions at different times of the day and night. It will increase the realism of the therapy.

WeStopFear, first among noise phobia therapy solutions, offers even more realism. In the real world, these sounds don’t come right after one another, with only several seconds between. Natural Intervals adds random episodes of silence of various length, automatically, between the sounds as well!

This makes experiencing the sounds more natural, more realistic, than the previous conventional method.

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Therapy Instruction # 8 of 12

> Play the sounds in various places. This is to avoid locational tolerance.
> Obtain a portable sound equipment if you don’t have one. Try getting it cheap, or borrow one.

Play the sounds in the various locations and types of locations where your dog spends time.

This could be inside, outside, and in the car while driving. Otherwise, your dog may become used to the sounds in one place but be fearful of them in other places. That is called locational tolerance.

To achieve this, you may have to use a portable audio system, that is powerful enough to give a realistic sound. If you will use a battery powered device, consider using re-chargeable batteries, for the environment, and to lower battery costs!

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Therapy Instruction # 9 of 12

> Keep the location free from other stimuli that may distract when doing the therapy.

Avoid unrelated things that demand attention.

Try to let the place be free from other environmental stimuli, for instance intrusive sounds, that may be distracting, while the therapy is being implemented.

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Therapy Instruction # 10 of 12

> Do what you like while the noises are playing. Don’t become bored yourself. Let all family members tolerate the process. Same goes for neighbours.

Do whatever you like while the sounds are playing, and act as if nothing special is going on.

It may be a good idea that you (or other household members) relieve yourself during this by listening yourself to favorite music or an audio book, or watch video or TV, with headphones.

Don‘t let the therapy be too difficult for the human population. Their irritation could build up and become an obstacle to doing this. See the dedicated page „Keep everyone happy“.

If you REALLY hate some sound that is playing (which can especially happen in the later steps when the soundsn are played at nearly full volume or at full volume) then don’t abruptly stop the playback. Rather, wait for that sound to finish and then secretly push the stop button during the silent moment between therapy sounds, and call it good for that day.

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Therapy Instruction # 11 of 12

> Consult your vet before starting.

Consult your vet before starting this therapy with your dog. Your veterinarian may have special insights into your dog’s health and situation, since they know your dog’s medical history.

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After finishing the five steps: Maintenance

Therapy Instruction # 12 of 12

> Maintain a short recap of the therapy once in a while. This would be at least once, maybe twice, a month or even more frequently for specific sounds that you knew were a problem in the original therapy process. Also redo it a few days before known stress-inducing events.
> Total resistance of new sounds cannot be promised. However, there should be greater tolerance to new sounds.

Your dog‘s tolerance will not stay forever. It is necessary to maintain it by playing the sounds again, as said above, at least once a month. This would be even more important before known fireworks events, or before the thunderstorm season.

It is probably enough to start at half volume, and it should take a shorter time. As before, let your dog‘s tolerance guide the speed.

A promise can not be given that your dog will have total resistance to any new sound, but there should be greater tolerance to new sounds. Your dog is more “worldly-wise” having mastered all these sounds in the therapy. It should take a shorter time than before to build tolerance. This is the brilliance of noise phobia therapy: To build up a tolerance for these alien noises, for a worry-free life.

In a large group of thousands of dogs, or pets, if all owners and handlers of this group would successfully implement this noise phobia therapy, it should result in a larger percentage of the group being free from problems related to unknown sounds, and a smaller percentage should be experiencing problems because of unknown sounds, compared to if no owner or handler would do this for their dogs and pets.

But an exact prediction of what this will mean for a particular dog or pet cannot be issued.

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(Stock images from 123rf.com, model release contract, referral link.)

Therapy Steps

[mbr_is_for tags=’WSF-Dogs-access-Step-1-page’]Step 1 (Very Low)[ELSE_is_for]Step 1 (Pending)[/mbr_is_for][mbr_is_for tags=’WSF-Dogs-Member-in-Step-2′]Step 2 (Low Volume)[ELSE_is_for]Step 2 (Pending)[/mbr_is_for][mbr_is_for tags=’WSF-Dogs-Member-in-Step-3′]Step 3 (Mid Volume)[ELSE_is_for]Step 3 (Pending)[/mbr_is_for][mbr_is_for tags=’WSF-Dogs-Member-in-Step-4′]Step 4 (Louder)[ELSE_is_for]Step 4 (Pending)[/mbr_is_for][mbr_is_for tags=’WSF-Dogs-Member-in-Step-5′]Step 5 (Full Volume)[ELSE_is_for]Step 5 (Pending)[/mbr_is_for][mbr_is_for tags=’WSF-Dogs-Member-In-After-Maintenance’]After: Maintenance[ELSE_is_for]Afterwards (Pending)[/mbr_is_for]

Will You Help Other Animals (And Their Owners)?

Image of a group of petsThere are millions of pets and animals in all countries that could benefit if their owners would conduct this innovative method of WeStopFear and the Simple Secure Steps for them.

Many would like to do this for their pets

And there are millions of pet owners who would be happy to do this for their beloved pets.

… but they don’t know about WeStopFear

So what is keeping them from doing it? Well, the simple fact that they don’t know about this innovative method, that is FREE to use FOREVER in its basic version, so they don’t even have to consider if they can afford the cost.

There are even possibly many pet owners that you know that have never heard of WeStopFear and the Simple Secure Steps to prevent or heal noise phobia, that can rob their pets of their happiness, feeling secure, their health or even lives.

You can help them and benefit yourself! Will you do that?

Here is how you can easily benefit, and do a good deed at the same time. You can tell them about WeStopFear and receive benefits in return, simply click here to send them a notification!

A more comprehensive version of WeStopFear is in the making. It will contain several extra features that are greatly convenient.

Here is the simple offer:

If you send a special email we prepare to five (5) friends and family members who own a pet or animal (of any type that WeStopFear services), and tell them about WeStopFear, then you will get FOR FREE the following five benefits:

You get:

  1. A special audio player on the page where you can choose and  play an individual sound. There is one player for each step, playing the therapy sounds at the right volume for that step. Currently you have a player that plays all sounds randomly.
  2. Three different, handy information forms for you to write your information about locations, audio devices, audio media, volume settings, the step you are at, and other comments for you to have at hand. These are offered in simple text format and Rich Text Format (.rtf) which you can edit, (applicable for both PC and Mac), and in PDF format.
  3. 20% Discount of the 5 CDs pack, if you want to play the therapy on a CD player.
  4. 20% discount in the DuFauna webstore (WeStopFear-linked design products, focusing on many dog breeds, cats, horses, and later on other pet types as well.)
  5. A dedicated section with valid discount codes on Redbubble, where WeStopFear-linked DuFauna design products are offered (focusing on many dog breeds, cats, horses, and later on other pet types as well) and millions of other designs and products as well, great for gifts or to indulge yourself.

WeStopFear individual sounds players and information forms

These benefits you will get for free, if you help your pet-owning friends and family members! You just need to send five (5)!

Do it right now. Click here!

(Below is a description of how exactly this happens. This simple and fun process is managed by UpViral.)

Sweepstakes: We will collect information about those who have initiated the greatest numbers of fresh signups on WeStopFear, and those will get a free full premium subscription for life, or as long as WeStopFear is active. Further information will be provided later.

In the email, there will be a special link for your friends or family members to sign up. This means that they now know about WeStopFear, and can easily start saving their pets from possible fear and phobia, and the bad consequences that can come with it. The pets and animals owned by your friends and family may have a good reason to thank you!

Your friends and family members, if they want to, can then tell pet-owning people they know about WeStopFear. This could start a snowballing effect, and it is needed!

Let’s help millions of pets and animals be free from fear. Click here!

This is valid for all the types of pets and animals served by WeStopFear, dogs, cats, horses, birds, small and exotic pets:

WeStopFear all pet types icons

You can go now and help by sending those emails. Click here!

The email sending process: You simply add emails of your friends and family members (minimum 5 emails but you can certainly send more if you like). Then add your name and email, and hit the SEND button! You can participate more than once if you like (but only send per email once). After submitting, you will get immediate access to the benefits listed above.